Are You Market Fit?

Are You Market Fit?

Education is important. The term itself is important enough to be formulated into a right. Countries all over the world recognize education as something extremely incremental to a child’s growth. Even the Universal Declaration of Human Rights specifically says that each child has a right to education.

Education all over the globe has been standardized, and one of the primary reasons why children are educated is to bring all of them up on a common platform, from where they can expand their knowledge into whatever fields they desire.

Many of us don’t know the difference between knowledge and education.

Although organizations and industries internationally take degrees with utmost importance, it is not the only factor that contributes to the recruitment of an individual. Your resume is a piece of paper containing a brief history of your professional and academic life – what you have studied, what you are good at, what have you done etc. Skills are something that makes a difference when it comes to getting hired, and one of the major factors and this makes skill building an integral part of your professional ecosystem.

One of the most popular arguments in the favor of skills is the following – ‘What separates you from your peer who has the same score in the eyes of an employer?’ Despite the statement being a cliche, it continues to be a strong argument in favor of skills. 

Over the past few years, the focus of industry has shifted more from the quality of education you’ve received, to the quality of work you can perform. This works in favor for most of us.

How?

If Education were taken as a sole factor contributing to hiring, then most of us, except the top 1% would’ve had a chance, but now not being able to be a part of an Ivy League, or a top tier, will never snuff out your chances of professional success.

Education still forms a foundation, but skills show how employable, or market-fit you are.

Market-fit here refers to – With your current skills, expertise and knowledge, can you join an organization, and work with them on an equal capacity, and if not, can you catch up fast? Skill building is necessary, but before you begin, you’ll need a certain mindset about the industry.

One way to judge your market-fitness is look through the industry you aim to work in, break it down.

  • Pick up a few references companies

What company would you like to work in? Do you have a few dream companies? Check them out. Find more organizations you would like to work in. You want to work at Spotify? Check out Apple Music as well, and while you’re at it, check out YouTube.

  • Check out the positions you aim to work in

What positions are you interested in? You are interested in Marketing, check out all the positions within that field, be it Management, or Strategist within Marketing. 

  • Read about the positions

Write down the responsibilities those jobs involve, and the skills those responsibilities require. Understand what the position is.

  • More Research

Check out other platforms like Glassdoor, read more about the said position, from people themselves. If you can get in touch with someone who holds the position you’re interested in, get in touch with them. Read blog posts, watch videos, find out more information first-hand.

This should be enough to give you an in-depth idea about what to expect if you aim to pick up a career in any field, and then you can begin skill building with the new and objective information you’ve gained.

To conclude this, I would personally urge the students to work on gaining marketable and employable skills, and not to remain stagnant. The industry is a dynamic entity, with continuously changing requirements. To catch up with them is not hard, but should you slack, it will get harder. 

Good Luck 🙂

Curated by

Yatharth Rai

Precisely

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